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An RCMP sting caught Nicole Doucet (Ryan) trying to hire a hitman to kill her ex-husband. It was supposed to be an open-and-shut case. It wasn’t. No Legal Way Out details the process, the media coverage, and the legal implications of R v Ryan, all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada. The outcome of the case limited the legal options for women seeking to escape abuse and had a damaging impact on public perceptions of domestic violence. This unabashedly feminist analysis explains why the court, the police, and the media let down all women trapped by intimate partner terrorism.

No Legal Way Out tells the story of one woman who felt trapped in an abusive relationship – and in a system that gave her no way to escape.

An RCMP sting caught Nicole Doucet (Ryan) trying to hire a hitman to kill her ex-husband. It was supposed to be an open-and-shut case. It wasn’t.

No Legal Way Out details the judicial process, media coverage, and legal implications of R v Ryan. Appealed up to the Supreme Court of Canada, Doucet’s initial acquittal – on the basis of duress in the context of abuse – was overturned, but a stay of proceedings meant that she could not be tried again. The court castigated the RCMP for not protecting her, prompting a one-sided investigation that ultimately exonerated the force and garnered substantial critical media attention for Doucet.

R v Ryan limited the legal options for women seeking to escape abuse and had a profoundly negative impact on public perceptions of domestic violence. This unabashedly feminist analysis explains why the court, the police, and the media let down all women trapped by intimate partner terrorism.

Introduction

1 Understanding Domestic Abuse and Femicide

2 Nicole Doucet, Her Story, and Her Trial

3 Decisions of the Courts

4 Policing the Police?

5 Trial by Media

Conclusion

Notes; Selected Bibliography; Index of Cases; Index

I highly recommend this well-written, well-referenced, and accessible book as a must-read for the legal profession. No Legal Way Out should be part of the curriculum for law, women's studies, sociology, and other academic programs that deal with domestic abuse.

An RCMP sting caught Nicole Doucet (Ryan) trying to hire a hitman to kill her ex-husband. It was supposed to be an open-and-shut case. It wasn’t. She was acquitted on the basis of duress in a context of abuse. But her ordeal did not end there.

No Legal Way Out details the judicial process, media coverage, and legal implications of R v Ryan, a landmark case in Canadian law for all the wrong reasons. Appealed up to the Supreme Court of Canada, Doucet’s acquittal was overturned, even though the court accepted that she had been abused. However, the court did issue a stay of proceedings so she could not be tried again. The court also castigated the RCMP for their actions, leading to an investigation that ultimately exonerated the force and garnered substantial media attention, much of it promoting stereotypes about abused women. The decision has had an enormously negative impact on public perceptions of domestic violence.

A quarter-century after R v Lavallee – which expanded the parameters of self-defence to include the experiences of abused women – R v Ryan limited the legal options for women seeking to escape intimate partner terrorism. No Legal Way Out is an unabashedly feminist analysis that explains why the court, the police, and the media let down all women trapped by abuse.

The R v Ryan case is extremely novel in legal terms, at all levels of court, and the paucity of study about it makes No Legal Way Out particularly important.

CA

This book is essential reading for feminist and other legal scholars, scholars in political science and women’s studies, and activists working with victims of intimate partner violence. It will also be of interest to many in the wider public.

Nadia Verrelli is an associate professor of political science at Laurentian University. She is the author of numerous articles and book chapters and editor of The Role of the Policy Advisor: An Inside Look, Canada: The State of the Federation, 2011 – The Changing Federal Environment: Rebalancing Roles? and The Democratic Dilemma: Reforming Canada’s Supreme Court. Lori Chambers is a professor of gender and women’s studies at Lakehead University. She is the author of Married Women and Property Law in Victorian Ontario and Misconceptions: Unmarried Motherhood and the Ontario Children of Unmarried Parents Act, 1921–1969, both winners of the Alison Prentice Award in Ontario women’s history. She is also the author of A Legal History of Adoption in Ontario, 1921–2015.

Nadia Verrelli and Lori Chambers provide readers with a critical, compelling discussion of a case of great public importance. This is a fascinating, most impressive work.

Catégories

Caractéristiques

    • ISBN
      9780774838085
    • Code produit
      256598
    • Éditeur
      UBC PRESS
    • Collection
      Landmark Cases in Canadian Law
    • Date de publication
      15 août 2021
    • Format
      Papier

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